San Francisco Police Department Chooses Samsung Galaxy Smartphones

November 14, 2013, By Fred Hoot

If you are old enough or if you watch some classic police TV shows you may remember or have seen a police call box. Located on many corners in major cities, the provided beat cops the communications lifeline with headquarters. By unlocking the box, an officer could get in touch with the central office to call for backup, medical assistance or the coroner.

San Francisco Police Department Chooses Samsung Galaxy SmartphonesWhen radios became small enough to carry, police officers started carrying walkie-talkies. The foot patrolman was no longer dependent on finding a police call box. Instant communication with police headquarters was a major improvement in increasing police safety. An added bonus with the smaller size radios is that officers in patrol cars now had communications when they were away from the patrol car.

San Francisco Police Department Chooses Samsung Galaxy Smartphones

Now the patrol cars in many cities have computers which have instant access to criminal data bases, the DMV registration data base for instant identification of automobiles, including tickets associated with their license plates and just about all information that a police officer would need before he or she walks into a situation. Now the beat officer needs that information.

Officers on foot patrol cannot practically carry around a laptop or tablet.  They can carry a smartphone quite easily. Enter the police smartphone.

Some San Francisco officers are already carrying Samsung Galaxy smartphones running Google’s Android operating system. These smartphones are also loaded with specialized apps that communicate with the police data bases.

If an officer wants to know what a suspect looks like, a quick reference of their mug shot from the police database makes identification easy. If they are serving a warrant, they can find out if the person is a violent criminal or not. They would even have access to the California firearms database to determine if the person has any firearms registered to them.

Eric Rasmussen of KTVU Channel 2 reported on his walk-along with Officers Chris Costa and Cody Barnes through the streets of San Francisco. It seems the officers really find the Samsung Galaxy smartphones with the law enforcement apps helpful in performing their duties.

Will this choice of Samsung over Apple smartphones lead to more lawsuits like the latest one whose monetary value is being determined by a jury? At least 1,600 officers will be carrying the new devices by the end of this year.

If you are old enough or if you watch some classic police TV shows you may remember or have seen a police call box. Located on many corners in major cities, the provided beat cops the communications lifeline with headquarters. By unlocking the box, an officer could get in touch with the central office to call for backup, medical assistance or the coroner.

When radios became small enough to carry, police officers started carrying walkie-talkies. The foot patrolman was no longer dependent on finding a police call box. Instant communication with police headquarters was a major improvement in increasing police safety. An added bonus with the smaller size radios is that officers in patrol cars now had communications when they were away from the patrol car.

Now the patrol cars in many cities have computers which have instant access to criminal data bases, the DMV registration data base for instant identification of automobiles, including tickets associated with their license plates and just about all information that a police officer would need before he or she walks into a situation. Now the beat officer needs that information.

Officers on foot patrol cannot practically carry around a laptop or tablet.  They can carry a smartphone quite easily. Enter the police smartphone.

Some San Francisco officers are already carrying Samsung Galaxy smartphones running Google’s Android operating system. These smartphones are also loaded with specialized apps that communicate with the police data bases.

If an officer wants to know what a suspect looks like, a quick reference of their mug shot from the police database makes identification easy. If they are serving a warrant, they can find out if the person is a violent criminal or not. They would even have access to the California firearms database to determine if the person has any firearms registered to them.

Eric Rasmussen of KTVU Channel 2 reported on his walk-along with Officers Chris Costa and Cody Barnes through the streets of San Francisco. It seems the officers really find the Samsung Galaxy smartphones with the law enforcement apps helpful in performing their duties.

Will this choice of Samsung over Apple smartphones lead to more lawsuits like the latest one whose monetary value is being determined by a jury? At least 1,600 officers will be carrying the new devices by the end of this year.

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