Google Project Glass Patent Filing Talks About Indirect Bone Conduction

January 26, 2013, By Sanjeev Ramachandran

Google Glass or Project Glass is one of Google’s new innovation that is up for patent. And a patent filing has been discovered that talks about the design of Google’s Glass.

Specifically speaking, there might be an inclusion of an indirect bone conduction speaker that would help to deliver audio to the wearer. What the indirect bone conduction speaker would do is to vibrate the frame of the eyewear, so that those vibrations would be transmitted through the skull of the wearer and into the inner ear.

Quite a path of transmission, don’t you think? Bone conduction speakers usually vibrate the bones but the method which Google uses involves the vibration of the frame of the eyewear and not the bone, which is why there is an ‘indirect’ in the name.

Google Project Glass Patent Filing Talks About Indirect Bone Conduction

Under Google’s method, the frames double up as a medium of transport of sound waves, and the vibration causes the frames to actually brush up your face, nose and temples. Google’s patent was filed under the title “Wearable Computing Device with Indirect Bone-Conduction Speaker” on October 10, 2011, and was noticed in public on January 24th, 2013.

The patent filing goes like this:
“A wearable-computing system comprising: one or more optical elements; a support structure comprising a front section and at least one side section, wherein the support structure is configured to support the one or more optical elements; an audio interface configured to receive an audio signal; and at least one vibration transducer located on the at least one side section, wherein the at least one vibration transducer is configured to vibrate the at least one side section based on the audio signal; wherein the support structure is configured such that when worn, a first portion of the at least one side section has an inner wall that contacts the wearer so as to vibrationally couple to a bone structure of the wearer; wherein the vibration transducer is located on a second portion of the at least one side section having an inner wall that does not contact the wearer, such that when the support structure is worn, the vibration transducer vibrates the support structure without directly vibrating a wearer.”

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