Nuance Dragon Go Could be Siri for Android

January 11, 2012, By Sanjeev Ramachandran

Siri is unique; many unimpressive voice assistant imitations in the Android Market would best vouch for it. But now we have something that is kind of like the Siri.

We are talking of Nuance Communications’ Dragon Go Android version, but we get to see that it cannot integrate with the device’s on-board apps and features. But when it comes to searching for content off the device it can match, if not beat, Siri’s capabilities.

Once Nuance’s network-based natural-language interpretation engine infers the searcher’s intent, Dragon Go directs queries to a stable of 200 content providers ranging from Dictionary.com to Fandango.

For instance, you will be directed to Spotify or Pandora when you ask for it to play your favorite music. Asking Dragon Go for show times for a movie, and it would take you to Fandango, giving you the option to immediately buy tickets.

Like Siri, Dragon Go can access Wolfram Alpha to provide answers to scientific or technical questions. For more general trivia or current events questions, it links to Ask.com.

Nuance would have to make sure this one works with each iteration of the Android OS. While Nuance said Dragon Go should work on any Android phone, certain features – like the media player – have to be optimized on a device-by-device basis.

So far, the list of optimized phones include the Samsung Galaxy Nexus S and Galaxy S II, the Motorola Razr, Droid X and Droid 3, and  the HTC Droid Incredible and MyTouch 4G.

At the CES podium, Nuance announced Dragon TV, a voice interface platform for televisions and set-top boxes. A consumer simply can’t download the TV app onto their living room sets, but Nuance hopes to work with connected TV manufacturers, set-top box, and cable service providers to embed its platform in their products.

Dragon TV also takes in natural language speech commands and spit out the intended results. For instance, you need to just say  ‘go to PBS’ and immediately be switched to the local affiliate, or ‘record Dexter’ to digitally tape the next scheduled recording of that show.

The platform can understand more complex commands, such as finding comedies starring Vince Vaughn, and handle requests such as sending text messages from the TV or updating a Facebook status, like Siri.

What do you think?

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